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Exhibition of
Taiji Kiyokawa
Memorial Gallery

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Taiji Kiyokawa, Painting No. 1593, 1993, Setagaya Art Museum

Taiji Kiyokawa, Painting No. 1593, 1993, Setagaya Art Museum

2019.10.26 - 03.15

Taiji Kiyokawa: Exploring Colors, Lines, and Shapes and Developing Designs

Overview

After moving to the U.S., Taiji KIYOKAWA completely switched to abstract expression and pursued a unique style of art in which he avoided depicting concrete forms. Exploring a beauty rooted in colors, lines, and shapes in his later years, KIYOKAWA made stainless-steel sculptures and designed a wide range of daily utensils such as tea sets. In the second of two exhibitions, we introduce the expansive development of the artist’s practice as seen in works from the 1960s onward.

Information

Dates:
Saturday, October 26, 2019 - Sunday, March 15, 2020
Closed:
Mondays (except November 4, January 13, 2020, and February 24, 2020), November 5, January 14, 2020, February 25, 2020, and New Year's holiday from December 29, 2019 (Sunday) to January 3, 2020 (Friday).
Hours:
10:00AM - 6:00PM (last entry: 30 min. before closing time)
Place:
Kiyokawa Taiji Memorial Gallery




Admission

Adults 200yen / Seniors(over 65) 100yen / University and high school students 150yen / Junior high and elementary school students 100yen
Group Discount
Adults 160yen / Seniors(over 65) 80yen / University and high school students 120yen / Junior high and elementary school students 80yen
*Discount applies to groups of 20 or more.
*Admission for visitors with disabilities is 100 yen. Students with disabilities, and one attendant per visitor with disabilities are admitted free of charge.
*Elementary and junior high school students are admitted free on weekends and national holidays.

Overview

After moving to the U.S., Taiji KIYOKAWA completely switched to abstract expression and pursued a unique style of art in which he avoided depicting concrete forms. Exploring a beauty rooted in colors, lines, and shapes in his later years, KIYOKAWA made stainless-steel sculptures and designed a wide range of daily utensils such as tea sets. In the second of two exhibitions, we introduce the expansive development of the artist’s practice as seen in works from the 1960s onward.