imgntv

Exhibition of
Mukai Junkichi Annex

next
up
Mukai Junkichi, Old Tree at Foot of Mountain (Kobuchisawa-cho, Kitakoma-gun, Yamanashi Prefecture) (1969)

Mukai Junkichi, Old Tree at Foot of Mountain (Kobuchisawa-cho, Kitakoma-gun, Yamanashi Prefecture) (1969)

2022.10.01 - 03.12

Once-in-a-Lifetime Landscapes:
Mukai Junkichi’s House Travelogue

Overview

For a 40-year period after World War II, Mukai Junkichi devoted himself to painting traditional thatched houses, which were in the process of disappearing. Each of Mukai’s trips was a series of encounters with irreplaceable landscapes. This exhibition focuses on these once-in-a-lifetime occurrences, including scenes that Mukai painted after spotting them from the train window, houses that sank to the bottom of a lake due to the construction of a dam. There are landscapes that Mukai painted all over Japan that are imbued with a sense of sorrow.

Information

Dates:
Sat., Oct. 1, 2022 to Sun., Mar. 12, 2023
Closed:
Mondays (except Oct. 10, 2022 and Jan. 9, 2023), Oct. 11, 2023, Jan. 11, 2022,
and New Year's holidays from Thu., Dec. 29, 2022, to Tue., Jan. 3, 2023
Hours:
10:00AM―6:00PM (last entry: 30 minutes before closing time)
Place:
galleries, Mukai Junkichi Annex

Admission

Adults 200 yen / Seniors (over 65) 100 yen / University and high school students 150 yen / Junior high and elementary school students 100 yen
Group Discount
Adults 100 yen / Seniors (over 65) 80 yen / University and high school students 120 yen / Junior high and elementary school students 80 yen
*Discount applies to groups of 20 or more.
*Admission for visitors with disabilities is 100 yen. Students with disabilities, and one attendant per visitor with disabilities are admitted free of charge.
*Elementary and junior high school students, who studies or resides in Setagaya city, are admitted free on weekends, national holidays, and during the summer holidays.

Overview

For a 40-year period after World War II, Mukai Junkichi devoted himself to painting traditional thatched houses, which were in the process of disappearing. Each of Mukai’s trips was a series of encounters with irreplaceable landscapes. This exhibition focuses on these once-in-a-lifetime occurrences, including scenes that Mukai painted after spotting them from the train window, houses that sank to the bottom of a lake due to the construction of a dam. There are landscapes that Mukai painted all over Japan that are imbued with a sense of sorrow.