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Past Special Exhibition

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2007.03.24 - 05.27

Taro Okamoto and His Contemporaries in the Post-War Era

Overview

Little Known Aspects of Taro Okamoto: The Prolific Years in Setagaya

In 1946, Okamoto (1911-1996) was discharged from the army and returned to Japan from the war zone. He set up a studio in Kaminoge in Setagaya and began painting once again. During the period of postwar recovery, he founded the Yoru no Kai (Evening Society) with Kiyoteru Hanada and others, advocating new forms of art and discussing a synthesis of the arts with writers. Okamoto announced his own theory of art, Polarism." At the same time, he was producing truly original paintings. This exhibition spotlights the seven and a half years that Okamoto spent in Setagaya before he moved his studio to Aoyama. It includes 20 major paintings by Okamoto and a large number of other artworks and documentation connected with other artists and writers working in the same period. It examines the remarkable cultural energy of the postwar era in Japan. "

Information

Dates:
March 24 (Saturday) – May 27 (Sunday), 2007 Museum closed on Mondays, except for April 30 which fall on national holidays. The museum will be closed on the Tuesdays following the days, exceptinally there is no closed day from April 28 through May 6.
Hours:
10:00 A.M.-6:00 P.M. Visitors must enter 30 minutes before closing time.
Place:
Setagaya Art Museum, 1st floor exhibition rooms
Admission:
General 900(720), college and high school students / 65 and older 700(560), junior high and elementary school students 400 (320)
Amount in parentheses applies to groups of 20 or more. Discount available for the handicapped.
Organizer:
Setagaya Art Museum, Setagaya Literary Museum, Taro Okamoto Memorial Museum, Taro Okamoto Museum of Art

Overview

Little Known Aspects of Taro Okamoto: The Prolific Years in Setagaya

In 1946, Okamoto (1911-1996) was discharged from the army and returned to Japan from the war zone. He set up a studio in Kaminoge in Setagaya and began painting once again. During the period of postwar recovery, he founded the Yoru no Kai (Evening Society) with Kiyoteru Hanada and others, advocating new forms of art and discussing a synthesis of the arts with writers. Okamoto announced his own theory of art, Polarism." At the same time, he was producing truly original paintings. This exhibition spotlights the seven and a half years that Okamoto spent in Setagaya before he moved his studio to Aoyama. It includes 20 major paintings by Okamoto and a large number of other artworks and documentation connected with other artists and writers working in the same period. It examines the remarkable cultural energy of the postwar era in Japan. "