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Notice of Temporary Closure
Setagaya Art Museum and its annexes are temporarily closed until May 31, 2021 as a preventive measure against the further spreading of the COVID-19 coronavirus.
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Special Exhibition

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Anna Mary Robertson “Grandma” Moses, Apple Butter Making (1947, private collection (currently entrusted to Galerie St. Etienne), © 2021, Grandma Moses Properties Co., NY).

special exhibitiongallery 1f

2021.11.20 - 02.27

Celebrating the 160th Anniversary of Her Birth
Grandma Moses: A Retrospective Exhibition

Overview

Known as an elderly female painter, Grandma Moses (Anna Mary Robertson Moses, 1860-1961) is recognized as one of America’s national artists. Moses, the wife of a farmer, first picked up a brush when she was over 70. Finding fame for works in which she used simple strokes to depict local life and farmland scenery, Moses painted until her death at 101 while continuing her life as a farmer’s wife. This exhibition introduces Moses’ way of life, which is full of implications for those of us living in the age of the centenarian.

Information

Dates:
Sat., Nov. 20, 2021 to Sun., Feb. 27, 2022
*(time and date reservation system)(Tentative)
Closed:
Mondays except Jan. 10 (nat.hol.), Tue., Jan. 11, 2022,
and New Year's holidays from Wed., Dec. 29, 2021, to Mon., Jan. 3, 2022
Hours:
10:00AM―6:00PM (last entry: 30 minutes before closing time)
Place:
1st floor galleries

Organized by:
Setagaya Art Museum (Setagaya Arts Foundation), TOEI COMPANY, LTD.,
BS-TBS, INC., The Asahi Shimbun
Supported by:
Embassy of the United States of America, Setagaya City, Setagaya City Board of Education
With cooperation of:
Galerie St. Etienne, NY, JAPAN AIRLINES
Sponsored by:
Sompo Japan Insurance Inc., Nissha Co., Ltd.

Admission

General admission: 1,600 yen, etc. (time and date reservation system)(Tentative)

Overview

Known as an elderly female painter, Grandma Moses (Anna Mary Robertson Moses, 1860-1961) is recognized as one of America’s national artists. Moses, the wife of a farmer, first picked up a brush when she was over 70. Finding fame for works in which she used simple strokes to depict local life and farmland scenery, Moses painted until her death at 101 while continuing her life as a farmer’s wife. This exhibition introduces Moses’ way of life, which is full of implications for those of us living in the age of the centenarian.