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Past Special Exhibition

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2005.12.17 - 02.12

Hisao Domoto Retrospective

Overview

Approximately 100 oil paintings and 10 drawings, ranging from seldom-exhibited early Japanese-style paintings to recent works being shown for the first time.

All of the art works in this exhibition are from the collections of the Hisao Domoto was born in Kyoto in 1928. His family had produced many artists and his uncle, Insho Domoto, was a well-known Japanese-style painter. Hisao made a spectacular debut in the world of Japanese-style painting, winning the Special Selection Prize in the Nitten Exhibition at the youthful age of 23. In 1952, while on a trip to Europe with his father, he decided to study in France. Moving to Paris alone in 1955, he switched from Japanese-style painting to oil painting. Art Informel was at the height of its popularity in Paris, and Domoto immediately began working in this style, quickly gaining attention as one of the principle figures of the movement. He eventually developed his own original style of painting while showing his work in both Paris and New York and his reputation grew as he participated in a number of international exhibitions. In 1967, he returned to Japan, setting up a studio in the Setagaya section of Tokyo. There he took up Japanese-style painting again, bringing fresh, new ideas to traditional media, and has continued working vigorously until today. The present exhibition contains approximately 100 oil paintings and ten drawings, including major works loaned from collections throughout Japan. The works range from seldom-exhibited early Japanese-style paintings to recent works being shown for the first time. We believe that this exhibition will give visitors an effective overview of the career of this important artist, who has continually been at the forefront of postwar Japanese art, as well as providing an excellent opportunity to think about the future of painting.

Information

Dates:
12/17 (Sat), 2005 - 2/12 (Sun), 2006
Closed:
Monday and New Year holidays
(December 19-January 3)
*1/9(mon)-open, 1/10(tue)-closed
Open:
10:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M.
(Visitors must enter at least 30 minutes before closing time.)
Place:
1st floor Special Exhibitions Gallery
Sponsor:
Setagaya Art Museum,
National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto
Subsidizer:
Japan Arts Fund

Admission

General, 800 (640) yen
College and high school students, 600(480) yen
Junior high and elementary school students, 400(320) yen
*Amounts in parentheses apply to groups of 20 or more.
*Discount available for handicapped persons.

Overview

Approximately 100 oil paintings and 10 drawings, ranging from seldom-exhibited early Japanese-style paintings to recent works being shown for the first time.

All of the art works in this exhibition are from the collections of the Hisao Domoto was born in Kyoto in 1928. His family had produced many artists and his uncle, Insho Domoto, was a well-known Japanese-style painter. Hisao made a spectacular debut in the world of Japanese-style painting, winning the Special Selection Prize in the Nitten Exhibition at the youthful age of 23. In 1952, while on a trip to Europe with his father, he decided to study in France. Moving to Paris alone in 1955, he switched from Japanese-style painting to oil painting. Art Informel was at the height of its popularity in Paris, and Domoto immediately began working in this style, quickly gaining attention as one of the principle figures of the movement. He eventually developed his own original style of painting while showing his work in both Paris and New York and his reputation grew as he participated in a number of international exhibitions. In 1967, he returned to Japan, setting up a studio in the Setagaya section of Tokyo. There he took up Japanese-style painting again, bringing fresh, new ideas to traditional media, and has continued working vigorously until today. The present exhibition contains approximately 100 oil paintings and ten drawings, including major works loaned from collections throughout Japan. The works range from seldom-exhibited early Japanese-style paintings to recent works being shown for the first time. We believe that this exhibition will give visitors an effective overview of the career of this important artist, who has continually been at the forefront of postwar Japanese art, as well as providing an excellent opportunity to think about the future of painting.